Childhood Letter of Introduction

Thank you for visiting this section of our website. The information provided in this section will likely provide you with up-to-date facts about Down syndrome. We are fortunate to have an organization right here in the Capital District that provides information and support to parents, professionals and individuals who seek information on issues about Down syndrome.

The Down Syndrome Aim High Resource Center (DSAHRC) is a not-for-profit organization with a Board of Directors, a professional staff, and families and professionals committed to increasing opportunities for individuals with Down syndrome. The purpose of DSAHRC is to enlighten and encourage the broader community to recognize the individuality, uniqueness, and capabilities of individuals with Down syndrome, and to reflect the hopes and dreams of those individuals and their families.

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Occupational Therapy and the Child with Down Syndrome

Maryanne Bruni, BSc OT(C)

If you are a parent reading this, you likely have a child with Down syndrome, as I do.  My intent with this article is to provide you with some information about how an occupational therapist (OT) may be able to help you and your child.  Occupational therapists who work with children have education and training in child development, neurology, medical conditions, psychosocial development, and therapeutic techniques.  Occupational therapists focus on the child's ability to master skills for independence.  This can include:

  • self care skills (feeding, dressing, grooming, etc.)
  • fine and gross motor skills
  • skills related to school performance (printing, cutting, etc.)
  • play and leisure skills

When your child is an infant, your immediate concerns relate to his health and growth, development of the basic motor milestones, social interaction with you and others, interest in things going on around him, and early speech sounds and responses.  At this stage, an OT may become involved to:

Testing at your child's school

A parent's guide to testing at your child's school.

Thoughts From the Middle of the Night

When my son Evan was born and I was told he had Down syndrome, I did not cry for a long time.  Then, as I was waiting for my daughter to visit us in the hospital, I saw a girl a few years older with her little brother walking hand in hand to the viewing window of the nursery, and I could not hold my tears back.  I knew that my daughter would never walk her little brother that way.  I knew he would never experience the small pleasures of life I always took for granted.  In those minutes, my heart was broken, and I was overcome with sadness for both my children.

Early Childhood Direction Center

ECDCD provides information, referral and support to families and professionals working with children, both typically developing and those with special education needs, ages birth through five

Welcome to Holland

I am often asked to describe the experience of raising a child with a disability - to try to help people who have not shared that unique experience to understand it, to imagine how it would feel. It's like this...

When you're going to have a baby, it's like planning a fabulous vacation trip - to Italy. You buy a bunch of guide- books and make your wonderful plans. The coliseum. The Michelangelo David. The gondolas in Venice. You may learn some handy phrases in Italian. It's all very exciting.

Extended School Year Programs and Services FAQ

IEP Team Meetings: A Guide to Participation for Parents

A parent's first encounter with the Individualized Education Program--the IEP--can be intimidating. However, participating in special education planning is critical in assuring positive long-term outcomes for students with disabilities.

Parents and guardians of school-age children with disabilities need to be familiar with relevant regulations and procedures for developing an IEP to fully participate in IEP development and long-term planning. Similarly, students who have attained legal adult statues in their state and have assumed responsibility for their own IEP need information to assure information participation at their IEP meetings.

The IEP Toolkit


The special education system can be confusing, frustrating, and overwhelming. The Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) is the written document that outlines your child's specific educational program. We know a strong IEP is necessary for our child's individual needs to be met. Yet is is common for us to feel insecure and unprepared during our child's IEP meeting. Surrounded by teachers, administrators, and special education personnel, our voice can get lost. This toolkit was written to help you find your voice.

As family members of a child with Down syndrome, we come to IEP meetings with love for our child and a commitment to his or her education. We must also come with a strong understanding of the IEP itself, detailed information about our child's specific needs, and an understanding of appropriate goals. This IEP Toolkit is designed to help you gather the necessary information. Focused preparation is essential to the development od an effective education plan, and a strong IEP leads to improved educational success for your child.

STRIDE

Sports & Therapeutic Recreation Instruction/& Developmental Education (STRIDE) Recreation for Challenged Children

STRIDE's Mission: STRIDE is a not-for-profit, 100% volunteer organization, dedicated to enriching the lives of children with disabilities, by offering sports and recreation opportunities. Challenging people, potential, and possibilities.

Language Guidelines

The correct name of this diagnosis is Down syndrome. There is no apostrophe (Down). The “s” in syndrome is NOT capitalized (syndrome).
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